Who Did Not Want Me to Reign Over Them?

2010 February 9

Filed in:

The Bible is a Book of Tales (Narrative Theology)


The whole of Luke 19 is directed at an extended metaphor – Jerusalem is Jericho, and Jesus is calling for the shouting that brings down the walls.

The first post in this set [HERE] showed the similarities between Zaccaeus and Rahab.

The second post [HERE] showed the similarities between the Parable of the Ten Minas and the allotment of  the land in Josh 11-20.

What does seeing  this pattern buy for us by way of interpretation now?  It helps us to see that Jesus is threatening the City of Jerusalem and its leaders.  The rest of Luke 19 confirms this theory.  Let’s begin with the parable, and work down to the end of the chapter.  And unlike Achan, we can keep any treasure we find along the way.
Keep Reading>

Advertisements

Joseph – the Stone that the Builders Rejected

2009 October 14

Filed In:

The Bible is a Book of Tales (Narrative Theology)


Joseph (Gen 37-50) is not in the LINE to David, but he is very Davidic.

He is rejected by his brothers, but later comes to rule them.

As David’s story is remembered: “The stone that the builders rejected
has become the cornerstone.” (Ps 118.22)

Of course, both men prefigure Jesus.

But there is another similarity between the three.  All three have a story where they are mistreated unjustly, 1) Joseph by Potiphar’s wife, 2) David by Saul and Nabal, and 3) Jesus by “his own people”

In all three cases, there is a “remember me, when you come into your Kingdom” line:

  • 13In three days Pharaoh will lift up your head and restore you to your office, and you shall place Pharaoh’s cup in his hand as formerly, when you were his cupbearer. 14Only remember me, when it is well with you, and please do me the kindness to mention me to Pharaoh, and so get me out of this house. (gen 40.13-14)
  • the LORD will certainly make my lord a sure house, …And when the LORD has done to my lord according to all the good that he has spoken concerning you and has appointed you prince over Israel, 31…And when the LORD has dealt well with my lord, then remember your servant.”” (1 Sam 25.28-31)
  • And we indeed justly, for we are receiving the due reward of our deeds; but this man has done nothing wrong.” 42And he said, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.” 43And he said to him, “Truly, I say to you, today you will be with me in Paradise.” (Luke 23.41-43)

The three of them are also shepherds:

  • “Joseph, being seventeen years old, was pasturing the flock with his brothers” (Gen 37.2)
  • 7I hear that you have shearers. Now your shepherds have been with us, and we did them no harm, and they missed nothing all the time they were in Carmel. 8Ask your young men, and they will tell you. Therefore let my young men find favor in your eyes, for we come on a feast day. Please give whatever you have at hand to your servants and to your son David.'” (1 Sam 25.7-8)
  • I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep.” (John 10.11)

———-

David’s Feast in the Wilderness

Compare David’s feast to Moses’ now:

8″Ask your young men, and they will tell you. Therefore let my young men find favor in your eyes, for we come on a feast day. Please give whatever you have at hand to your servants and to your son David.”… 14But one of the young men told Abigail, Nabal’s wife, “Behold, David sent messengers out of the wilderness to greet our master, and he railed at them….”Nabal, …was holding a feast in his house, like the feast of a king. …and his heart died within him, and he became as a stone. 38And about ten days later the LORD struck Nabal, and he died.

Nabal is Pharaoh who refuses a feast for the Son of God in the wildreness – the Lord hardened his heart.

———-

Joseph is a Judge of Israel like Jesus

Consider two passages in this cross connection:

“Joseph, being seventeen years old, was pasturing the flock with his brothers. He was a boy with the sons of Bilhah and Zilpah, his father’s wives. And Joseph brought a bad report of them to their father.” (Gen 37.2)

“And he answered them, saying, “Do you want me to release for you the King of the Jews?” 10For he perceived that it was out of envy that the chief priests had delivered him up.” (Mark 15.9-10)